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WOMEN IN 1837

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WOMEN IN 1837

Women in 1837 is a 3D poster that represents the differences between upper class and working class women in 1837, the year Tiffany and Co. first opened its doors. Women of the upper class, who bought products from Tiffany and Co., were weighed down by expectations of purity and modesty. Women in the lower class, who made products for Tiffany and Co., were treated as outcasts and hidden away in factories. This poster tells both stories.

 
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women of the upper class

Women of the upper class are represented by the outer skirt. The ornate details and white color signify the expectations of purity and modesty for upper class women in 1837.

Women of the working class

Women of the working class are represented by the black boning underneath the skirt to signify the oppression of these women in 1837. The boning tells the story of the working class women through data: products made by these women and the number of women working in factories around the United States. In order to view the boning, one must get down on ones knees and look up the skirt. This is designed to be uncomfortable and emulate how much of society viewed the working class as subhuman.

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